July 2006

CARE HOME SEX FIEND GETS 15 YEARS’ JAIL; Ex-principal raped two young girls

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A FORMER Coventry children’s home boss has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for sex attacks on young girls. 

Kevin Donaldson, aged 62, was found guilty of rape and indecent assault at a home for teenage girls almost 30 years ago. 

He was principal of the former Newfield House community home in Kingfield Road, Foleshill, at the time. 

The residential home for “troubled girls” was run by the city council until it closed in 1982. 

At Birmingham Crown Court yesterday a jury convicted Donaldson of two charges of rape. It involved two different girls, both under 16. 

He was also convicted of nine counts of indecently assaulting girls under 18. 

He was cleared of two other charges of rape, three counts of indecent assault and a charge of gross indecency. Donaldson, of Maudslay Road, Chapelfields, Coventry, had denied all charges. 

The charges date back to between 1977 and 1982. 

Over the past seven weeks, several former residents were at Birmingham Crown Court to give evidence against Donaldson. 

He stopped working for the city council when the home was closed because more youngsters were being cared for in foster homes. 

Yesterday, Coventry City Council issued the following statement: 

“Throughout the investigation, subsequent trial and conviction, Coventry City Council has cooperated fully with the police in order to secure these convictions. 

“The council would like to pay tribute to the courage of the exresidents who came forward to ensure that justice was done. 

“These events occurred nearly 30 years ago when nationally social work practice and legislation governing the safeguarding of children was limited. 

“Since then mechanisms have significantly improved with the aim of ensuring the protection and safety of vulnerable young people. 

“These include the implementation of both internal and external reviewing structures such as the employment of independent visitors’ inspection of children in residential accommodation by inspectors from the Commission for Social Care Inspection and agencies such as Child Line and the NSPCC.”