March 2016

Five more years in jail for man who assaulted school-age girls in ‘wicked, heartbreaking’ case

04/11/2015           Crown Court: Raymond Williams, on trial for historic sex assaults on two daughters

A Plymouth man who assaulted school age children has been jailed for an extra five years after a Court of Appeal hearing.

Raymond Williams, 60, was originally jailed for three years for abusing two girls over a period of months in the early 1980s.

Following an application by Solicitor General Robert Buckland QC MP, the Court of Appeal has today increased Mr William’s sentence to eight years.

Mr Williams took advantage of his position as the girls’ babysitter. The girls endured an abusive upbringing and were particularly vulnerable: they were repeatedly left alone or locked in the bedroom for long periods with a bucket in which to urinate. The lack of food or water was such that, on one occasion one of the girls became so desperate she drank her own urine. On another occasion the children were given cat food to eat.

 Speaking after the hearing today the Solicitor General said: “The case files are utterly heart breaking to read. It is wicked that the two young sisters were not properly protected by the adults in their lives. I referred this sentence as the total sentence of 3 years’ imprisonment failed adequately to reflect the gravity of the offending, the number of victims and the aggravating circumstances of the case”.

In January this year the girls’ mother was been jailed for five years for turning a blind eye as a string of men sexually abused her three daughters.

The cruel mother, now a 71-year-old grandmother, worked as a prostitute while babysitters and clients indecently assaulted the girls.

She rejected their complaints of abuse in the 1970s and 1980s – which allowed most of the abusers to escape justice.

One of the daughters told Plymouth Crown Court she had repeatedly attempted suicide from the age of seven.

The mother-of-seven also locked her daughters in their room for hours or even days at a time with nothing to eat and drink and a bucket for a toilet.

The women told a jury they were sometimes force to drink their own urine and once had to eat cat food because there was nothing else in the house on a Plymouth estate.

Recorder Stephen Parish told her: “You enjoyed sexual relations with a number of men, some of whom paid for your services.

“Even if you did not encourage what was happening to your daughters, at the very least you turned a blind eye to it.”

He added that she sent two of the girls to collect loans from a man, knowing in return he would expect sexual favours from them.

Recorder Parish said that most of the abusers had “escaped justice”.

The jury heard that police identified about half a dozen suspects, all but one of whom have since died.

One man, Ralph Burns, was due to stand trial for rape but died of lung cancer only two weeks before at the age of 59.

Raymond Williams, aged 60, formerly of Dovedale Road, Ham, was jailed for three years for abusing two of the daughters.

He took advantage of his position as a trusted babysitter while the judge said their mother pursued her own “selfish pleasures”.

The London grandmother, who cannot be named for legal reasons, went on trial after denying ten counts of child cruelty between 1976 and 1988. She was convicted by a jury of eight of the charges after a trial in October and November.

Williams was convicted at the trial of two counts of sexual assault against the middle daughter.

He had already admitted two counts of indecently assaulting the middle daughter – the charges covering multiple incidents of a less serious form of abuse.

Williams also pleaded guilty to indecently assaulting the youngest girl on a single occasion.

Nigel Wraith, for the Crown Prosecution Service, summarised statements prepared by the three daughters.

He said one daughter had tried to commit suicide at the age of seven and had made another attempt on her life at the age of ten.

Mr Wraith added she had made further attempts into adulthood and resorted to solvent abuse to block out the memories.

Kerry Dowse, for the woman, said she still denied the offences which she had committed.

She said: “She had an upbringing and early childhood none of us could imagine and it appears by the jury’s verdicts, it is one that was reflected in the way she brought up her own children.”

Miss Dowse said she was an “inadequate person” who was unable to cope with the situation she found herself in.

She added that she had health difficulties, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and diabetes.

Miss Dowse said the conditions would make it far more difficult to cope with in prison.

Kelly Scrivener, for Williams, said: “He has very little clear understanding of why he committed these offences over a few months in the early 80s.”

She added he was drinking heavily at the time after the break-up of a relationship.

Miss Scrivener said he had never since tried to abuse any children.

She added he was sorry and had attempted to take his own life.

HISTORY OF A VILE MOTHER

THE CRUEL mother claimed she was the victim of lies and gossip while she suffered at the hands of a string of abusive and cheating partners.

It was true that she once lived on the streets and suffered hardship in her life more akin to Victorian times.

But the jury threw out her story that she did not neglect or abandon her children – or expose them to sexual assault by a string of visiting men.

The mother-of-seven implied that she was branded a prostitute because her children had five different fathers.

Four children lived with her in Plymouth, with her three daughters all sexually abused by men at her home on the city estate.

She told the court she grew up in London as part of a close family.

The woman left school at 15 to work as a factory machinist and was married at the age of 16.

She and her husband had two children but the woman said she walked out when she discovered he was having an affair.

She told the court that she moved back in with her mother and her children lived with her mother-in-law.

The woman added she worked in a crèche and as a college dinner lady in the evenings.

She said she fell pregnant with her third child but said nothing of the father.

The woman then fell out with her mother and was forced to leave her home with her new baby.

She went to social services sometime around 1968 and was put on a list to go to an unmarried mothers’ home – with a home in Plymouth the first to offer a place.

The woman said: “It was horrendous. The place was overrun with fleas. It was not very hygienic. I was there for about six months, I am not sure.

“I wrote a letter to someone, (Prime Minister) Harold Wilson, I cannot remember.”

But instead of the authorities jumping in to clean up the home, the woman was thrown out on her ear.

She said she was living on the streets with her baby.

The woman was eventually placed in homes around the city, before she ended up in the three-bedroom house on the city estate.

She fell into relationships with a string of men, with four of them fathering the three boys and girl who lived with her at the time of the abuse.

None of them provided a steadying influence in her life.

All four of those children gave evidence against her and helped the jury close a chapter on her tale of woe.

January 2015

Girls who were sexually abused ate cat food and drank urine

45

Pictured: Raymond Williams (left) and the mum, who cannot be named for legal reasons (right)

A VILE mum has been jailed for five years for turning a blind eye as a string of men sexually abused her three daughters.

The cruel mother, now a 71-year-old grandmother, worked as a prostitute while babysitters and clients indecently assaulted the girls.

She rejected their complaints of abuse in the 1970s and 1980s – which allowed most of the abusers to escape justice.

One of the daughters told Plymouth Crown Court she had repeatedly attempted suicide from the age of seven.

The mother-of-seven also locked her daughters in their room for hours or even days at a time with nothing to eat and drink and a bucket for a toilet.

The women told a jury they were sometimes force to drink their own urine and once had to eat cat food because there was nothing else in the house on a Plymouth estate.

Recorder Stephen Parish told her: “You enjoyed sexual relations with a number of men, some of whom paid for your services.

“Even if you did not encourage what was happening to your daughters, at the very least you turned a blind eye to it.”

He added that she sent two of the girls to collect loans from a man, knowing in return he would expect sexual favours from them.

Recorder Parish said that most of the abusers had “escaped justice”.

The jury heard that police identified about half a dozen suspects, all but one of whom have since died.

One man, Ralph Burns, was due to stand trial for rape but died of lung cancer only two weeks before at the age of 59.

Raymond Williams, aged 60, formerly of Dovedale Road, Ham, was jailed for three years for abusing two of the daughters.

He took advantage of his position as a trusted babysitter while the judge said their mother pursued her own “selfish pleasures”.

The London grandmother, who cannot be named for legal reasons, went on trial after denying ten counts of child cruelty between 1976 and 1988. She was convicted by a jury of eight of the charges after a trial in October and November.

Williams was convicted at the trial of two counts of sexual assault against the middle daughter.

He had already admitted two counts of indecently assaulting the middle daughter – the charges covering multiple incidents of a less serious form of abuse.

Williams also pleaded guilty to indecently assaulting the youngest girl on a single occasion.

Nigel Wraith, for the Crown Prosecution Service, summarised statements prepared by the three daughters.

He said one daughter had tried to commit suicide at the age of seven and had made another attempt on her life at the age of ten.

Mr Wraith added she had made further attempts into adulthood and resorted to solvent abuse to block out the memories.

Kerry Dowse, for the woman, said she still denied the offences which she had committed.

She said: “She had an upbringing and early childhood none of us could imagine and it appears by the jury’s verdicts, it is one that was reflected in the way she brought up her own children.”

Miss Dowse said she was an “inadequate person” who was unable to cope with the situation she found herself in.

She added that she had health difficulties, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and diabetes.

Miss Dowse said the conditions would make it far more difficult to cope with in prison.

Kelly Scrivener, for Williams, said: “He has very little clear understanding of why he committed these offences over a few months in the early 80s.”

She added he was drinking heavily at the time after the break-up of a relationship.

Miss Scrivener said he had never since tried to abuse any children.

She added he was sorry and had attempted to take his own life.

November 2015

Man tells jury he is ‘not quite sure’ why he abused girls

04/11/2015 Crown Court: Raymond Williams, on trial for historic sex assaults on two daughters

A MAN who sexually assaulted two sisters has told a child cruelty trial he was “not quite sure” why he did it.

Raymond Williams, aged 60, has admitted indecently assaulting the girls in the 80s.

The mother of the sisters is on trial at Plymouth Crown Court after denying ten charges of child cruelty between 1976 and 1988.

Williams, of Dovedale Road, Ham, has pleaded guilty to two counts of indecently assaulting the middle daughter in 1981 and 1982.

 He has also admitted indecently touching the youngest daughter between 1982 and 1984.

Williams remains on trial because he has denied two more serious counts of indecently assaulting the middle daughter over the same period.

He admitted indecently touching the middle sister in her bed on many occasions over a six-month period when she was ten or 11.

Williams also said he indecently touched the youngest daughter once when she was four or five.

Williams, giving evidence, told the court that he was drinking heavily at the time after splitting up with his partner.

He added that he worked as a crane driver but also helped with a group of city majorettes.

Williams said the mother of the girls was a friend who allowed him to babysit at weekends.

Kelly Scrivener, for Williams, asked him: “You were asked during police interview why you touched these girls. Is it something you can understand yourself looking back 35 years later?”

He replied: “I am not quite sure now.”

Williams said he committed the offences behind their mother’s back.

She allegedly worked as a prostitute and allowed clients and boyfriends access to her three daughters.

The girls, all of primary school age, were regularly touched indecently and in one case raped at the home on a city estate.

The mother, who cannot be named for legal reasons, is also accused of locking her children in a bedroom and beating them.

She allegedly failed to feed them properly so that on one occasion they were forced to eat cat food.

Earlier, the jury heard details of the arrest and police interviews of the mother and Williams

The woman gave a prepared statement and then refused to answer further questions.

She said she “very distressed” to hear upon her arrest of the claims of sexual abuse from her daughters.

The woman said: “Had I been made aware of the allegations during their childhoods, I would have investigated and told the authorities. At no point did the girls confide in me.”

She denied being a prostitute at the time.

The woman said: “I deny leaving the children with little money or food and I would never have done anything that would have intentionally harmed the children.

“I never would have left my children with anyone I considered was unsuitable.”

The trial continues.